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Posts Tagged ‘Rose’

Question by jch_2000: What rose to plant?
I’m looking to get a rose that lives long, is resistant to deseases. Looking for pink color and with a sweet perfume. A plant that lives well in the San Jose area of California

Best answer:

Answer by thor
any rosa ragosa growing in the area? They grow wild here in very unroselike conditions.

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Mountain Rose Herbs

www.ezsleepsolutions.com – Wanda has sleep problems and has tried everything. She is desperately looking for a new sleep remedy. She gets introduced to sleep herbs. If “she can try it” so can you.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Article by Brandon Fuhrmann

John Singer Sargent was an American artist born in Florence Italy, to American and expatriate parents. Receiving his first formal art instruction in the City of Rome in 1868, the young John Singer Sargent floated around Florence between 1870 in 1873, before he was accepted at the Paris Cold Art School. Although a dual citizen of America and France, it would take John Singer, until the age of 21, before he would step foot on American soil. Intensely intelligent and trilingual in several languages, Sargent was able to rub elbows with some of the most important European aristocracy, and wooed the American well-heeled socialites, as well. With everything that John Singer Sargent attempted to complete, came success and notoriety. This American artist was said to have a special quality about him, a mere attraction that screamed brilliance and periscope-absolute refinement. The only hurdle left was the question of what John Singer Sargent would do next; a brilliant artist is as well as dynamic personality, he had the world at his feet. That question was answered in relatively short time as Sargent became one of the world’s greatest artists and one of the most sought after muralist, in both Europe and America.

John Singer Sargent was humble to a certain degree, yet could be calculating and direct when needed, and once said that color is an inborn gift, but appreciation of color value is merely training of the eye, which everyone ought to be able to acquire. Although born into a well-to-do family, John Singer Sargent also possessed a work attitude that bordered on the edge of fanatical. Even though obviously genetically gifted in the artistic world, John Singer started and was not satisfied with this and would spend long days, sketching everything that crossed his path, and would say that you can do sketches enough, sketched everything and key good curiosity for us, and testament to his own characteristics and successful demeanor.

John Singer Sargent became one of the most successful portrait painters of his era, and also was a gifted and sought after land state painter. John Singer Sargent never wavered in his love of France and Europe yet found the natural beauty of America, to be more than accommodating for his artistic desires. One of his most remarkable paintings, ‘Carnation Lily Lily Rose’, was painted in 1885, and shows the detail that only John Singer Sargent could pull off and produce from an oil painting. This masterful work of art has an equally matching and wonderful storyline, behind its creation and inspiration. The painting was created during the autumn time at Farnham House and Russell House, which were the family homes of Frank Millet. The two girls pictured in the painting are the daughters of Frederick Bonnard and his wife Alice. John Singer Sargent wanted to illustrate the fading of the flowered background, and highlighted the lily white dresses, in an attempt to contrast the beauty of life with the finality of death. The work took a full week or so, with painstakingly readiness of both children and Millet and Bernard family. This was in a time when only the natural light would do and this comes across in this truly masterful production by John Singer Sargent. John Singer Sargent illustrated his approach to painting Carnation Lily Lily Rose, when he pointed out that the paints have no chance at capturing the most- central quality and beauty of the flowers and bright green lawn background, what was produced, was one of the most stunningly beautiful reflections of light on canvas of all the 19th century artesian of the era. By capturing the many different types of light that was flooding down upon the ‘Lily’ scene Sergeant was able to adequately cement his mane in place for one of the most spectacular artist that came out of Europe or the Americas.

Brandon Fuhrmann writes on art for Ownapainting.com. Ownapainting.com offers 100% hand-painted reproductions of over 10,000 titles. Visit Ownapainting.com for more information on Sargent Reproductions or the painting of Carnation, Lily Lily Rose itself.










Is it possible to read auras from regular photos? Rose Rosetree has taught thousands to do this worldwide, and would love to teach you. Here she explains about the three levels of energetic literacy. Full literacy is a basic survival skill for this third millennium. Increase your confidence at reading chakra databanks, gifts, and STUFF.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

All these killcams were recorded in public matches and were not in anyway setup. I do not upload these killcams to show off skill. They are meant for your enterntainent.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


This is a spoken version (with introduction) of the old Scottish favourite “My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose” by Robert Burns presented by David Sibbald of www.robertburns.plus.com from his CD “The Greatest Love Poems in the World.” My Love is Like a Red Red Rose O, my luve’s like a red, red rose, That’s newly sprung in June. O, my luve’s like the melodie, That’s sweetly play’d in tune. As fair art thou, my bonie lass, So deep in luve am I, And I will luve thee still, my Dear, Till a’ the seas gang dry. Till a’ the seas gang dry, my Dear, And the rocks melt wi’ the sun! OI will luve thee still, my Dear, While the sands o’ life shall run. And fare thee weel, my only Luve, And fare thee weel a while! And I will come again, my Luve, Tho’ it were ten thousand mile!